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 Post subject: Moving Windows 7 from a 512B drive to a 4K drive
 Post Posted: Tue Jan 03, 2012 5:22 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 10:54 am
Posts: 196
Location: Minneapolis, MN
I will be moving my Windows 7 install from a 512B drive to the second-gen Momentus XT drive, a 4K drive. Windows 7 was installed and later updated to SP1. Do I need to do anything for Windows 7 to interact with the drive using 512e instead of 512B? My understanding is Windows only supports 512e, which is 512B logical and 4K physical. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library ... =100215959. Thanks.

Edit: Seagate's Discwizard v13 may solve the problem, http://seagate.custkb.com/seagate/crm/s ... NewLang=en, but it says I should install with SP1 for optimal results. Will installing Win7 and then having updated it to SP1 as above cause problems?


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 Post subject: Re: Moving Windows 7 from a 512B drive to a 4K drive
 Post Posted: Wed Jan 04, 2012 12:33 am 
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Joined: Sun Feb 04, 2007 11:44 am
Posts: 5855
Quote:
Do I need to do anything for Windows 7 to interact with the drive using 512e instead of 512B?

The only issue is one of partition alignment. To enable maximum performance you want the partitions on a 4K sector drive to be aligned to 4K boundaries. Windows Vista and later *automatically* create 4K aligned partitions (even on drives with 512B sectors), XP and earlier do not. I cover 4K alignment (and how to check for it) in detail in URPCs 20th, here is an excerpt:

    You can use at least two methods to check the alignment of a partition under Windows. One is to open a command prompt and enter the following command:

    wmic partition get Name, StartingOffset

    The command result shows the starting offset of all the partitions on all the drives connected to the system. For example, here is the output after running the command on a system with two drives installed, each with a single primary partition:
    Code:
    Name                  StartingOffset
    Disk #0, Partition #0 32256
    Disk #1, Partition #0 1048576

    In this example, the first drive has a starting offset of 32,256 bytes. To see if this would be aligned on a 4K sector drive (or SSD), divide that number by 4,096. The result is 7.875, which is not an even number, indicating that this partition is not aligned. This is in fact the standard offset created by a non-4K aware OS such as Windows XP, and it is equal to 63×512 bytes, indicating that the partition starts at LBA 63.

    To check the alignment for the partition on the second drive, divide the starting offset of 1,048,576 by 4,096. The result is an even 256, which is an even number, indicating that this partition is properly aligned. This in fact is equal to 2,048×512 bytes, indicating that the partition starts at LBA 2,048.


Bottom line: Simply create the destination drive partition using Windows 7, and you can use the above procedure to check that it is 4K aligned. Scott.


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