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 Post subject: Server Certifications
 Post Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2007 4:02 am 
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Hi Scott,

I have always been asked about N+, Netware, Cisco, MCSE... certifications. And I thought it wise to humbly ask for your opinion!

What Certifications do you recommend for a person who is going to deal with Servers(Microsoft based Servers: 2000, 2003, 2003 R2,2008...) – basically Server Configuration and Security issues? Things like N+, Cisco, Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE)…

Probably, I would think Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer might be better, simply because they are the developers of the Server software! So getting their Certifications make you more competent in dealing with their Servers! What are your thoughts about these certifications more importantly (Cisco --CCNA, CCNP and MCSE)?

Do you have any books on Servers, basically Microsoft based Servers?

Thanks.

Kit


Last edited by Kit Emma on Sun Nov 04, 2007 1:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2007 10:42 am 
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Upgrading and Repairing Servers includes a DVD showing how to build an
inexpensive yet high performance entry-level pedestal or rack mount server
from scratch, as well as presentations on the components used to build a
server including RAID controllers and drive arrays.

Upgrading and Repairing Servers (with 1-hour DVD)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/078972815X

URServers is also available as an ebook in Adobe PDF form:
http://www.quepublishing.com/title/0768666686

The best certifications to get are the ones that will help you get the most jobs, after all that is really their purpose. For that I recommend you ask prospective employers what they are looking for. Let me know what you find, Scott.


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 Post Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2007 10:51 pm 
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Hi Scott,

Thanks!

Well, many ask for Cisco and MCSE! For many institutions and Universities in my Area, are now incorporating Cisco as part of the Curriculum in IT related disciplines! For that reason many employers in my Area tend to recognize Cisco Certifications as an alternative or added advantage to a University Degree and/or Diploma, for Servers and/or Networking related jobs. For those who deal with Microsoft Servers alone, require MCSE!

Kit.


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 Post Posted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 7:52 pm 
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Hey Kit I am on my way with Microsoft certs. I am taking the test for 70-270 next week. You should know though that you have to start with Comptia certs. Get A+ and Net+ first which will be your foundation.


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 Post Posted: Wed Oct 17, 2007 11:58 am 
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Hi FatGuy,

Thanks for your consideration! Though, I suppose, that could be very costly if really you wanted to specialize in Servers. Certifications may be very good for job-entry level, but you need more than that to manage and keep your job! Personally, with an IT University Degree/Diploma, I could opt purchasing Scott's book “Upgrading and Repairing Servers ”, that can teach me how to build inexpensive yet high performance entry-level pedestal or rack mount server from scratch! This could also give me a very neat foundation in Servers. Then I could do one Server-based certification that will aid me find a great job if I consider being employed, for accreditation, perhaps MCSE. That could be a great opt for me, probably others if they are passionate enough and know what they want!

Thanks! My prayers are with you! Good Luck in your Tests!

Kit.


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 Post Posted: Wed Oct 17, 2007 10:26 pm 
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That is right but you need to keep up to date with certifications also, especially Microsoft. They are not just good for entry level positions, a lot of people already working in the field are told my their employers that they must go and get these certifications. There is no real "specialization" in servers and no specific "server" certification. Its more what you want to do and what type of position you want. If you want to be a Network Admin, your definitely going to be working with a Server O.S...If you want to be an Engineer you are also going to be working with a Server O.S....A "server" doesn't need to be much but just meet the requirements for the specific o.s. you are running on it. The term "Server" does not define hardware at all. Like I said though you do have to have the basics covered with A+ and Net+. As far as schooling goes, you are better off at actual school than just training at home. At my school I do get actual hands on training and labs. These are the things that help the most, but believe me you need both the reading of books, watching videos, and actual hands on work and labs to hammer down, and hone your skills. You have to start with the Comptia exams before you go one to Microsoft. Thanks for wishing me good luck!. I appreciate that!.

http://certification.comptia.org/

http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcitp/default.mspx

With the Microsoft certs you have to start off with a certain exam depending on what certification you want to end up with. The link above has information on all Microsoft paths.


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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 3:44 am 
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FatGuy wrote:
The term "Server" does not define hardware at all... These are the things that help the most, but believe me you need both the reading of books, watching videos, and actual hands on work and labs to hammer down, and hone your skills...You have to start with the Comptia exams before you go one to Microsoft...


Thank you!

Sticking on the topic about "Server certifcations", your last statement in the quote answers my question. Thanks so much!

1. I understand that "Servers" fall under the different types of Computers. All the books I've read list them as type of computers. And I believe, when one speaks about computers, "both Software and Hardware" are involved. And when we built something like "rack mount 'Server' ", which I guess is hardware related. So, what do you imply with this statement -- "The term "Server" does not define hardware at all... "?

2. I believe the Network Admin. will basically deal with "Server OS" - such as Microsoft Windows Server 2003 RS, 2008... and the Network Engineer will deal with "Server OS" at some point, but most of his work will mainly be hardware related such as dealing with Dell powerEdge 1955 Blade Server or Blade Server Fibre Channel/Blade Server iSCSI, Rack Servers, Tower servers

http://www1.euro.dell.com/content/produ ... bsd&~ck=mn

plus dealing with routers, swtiches, hubs, bridges...

Though Microsoft Systems Engineer will basically design, plan, implement, manage, and maintain a messaging infrastructure by using Microsoft Exchange Server.

http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcse/default.mspx

3. Subjectively, I can't afford all those certifications! Instead I purchase Scott's books and DVDs that give me an equal opportunity to stay in place!

4. Objectively, I strongly encourage and recommend students, PC enthusiats... to get all these certifications.

Thanks.

Kit.


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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 4:39 pm 
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Rackmount would just describe how the hardware is placed, "mounted" on a rack. Server does not imply hardware. A server, just "serves" other pcs or workstations. It would run a server operating system, but the term doesn't imply a powerfull pc with a lot of ram and hard drive space. Any old pc can be a server as long as its running a server os, and has the hardware requirements to run that os. You see so it doesn't imply special hardware or the type of pc. Its just its purpose, to "serve" and it runs a server type of os.


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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 11:31 pm 
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Hi FatGuy,

Basically the Server am talking about is a Client/Server model -- A dedicated Server! I really understand that the major difference between servers and PCs is not in the hardware but in the software. Being a major difference does to mean that there are NO other differences whatsoever! I believe the ability for a dedicated Server to "Serve" up resources to the machines on the network will depend on the platform --sophisticated and expensive NOSs and specialized hardware that is optimized for the needs of servers like Quad-Core Intel® Xeon® Processor 5300 Series speciality Processors (High-End) that don't really fit so nicely into the PC group.

http://download.intel.com/products/proc ... dbrief.pdf

Scott Mueller's Upgrading and Repairing PCs 16th Edition, page 1104 Chapter 20 Local Area Networking, the last paragraph, Scott, talks about dedicated Servers. And he says, "A dedicated server computer typically has a faster processor, more memory, and more storage space than a client because it might have to service dozens or even hundreds of users at the same time. High-performance servers also might use two or more processors, use the 64-bit version of the PCI expansion slot for server-optmized network interface cards, and have redundant power supplies..." All this is powerful hardware!


Though, 'the server just "serves" other pcs or workstation', it can't just do that on sophisticated NOS alone, it will need specialized hardware that will enable it perform at it's best!

Thank you so much! God bless.

Kit.


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 Post Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 9:23 am 
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Kit it all depends on what you are using the server for just like a regular home pc, you wouldn't go out and purchase a pc for your home with a quad core sli setup if you were just using it to write resumes. Just like a server. There is no need for extra expensive hardware at all, it just depends on its use.

Let me try to give you an example. At home your network would be workgroup based....At work though it makes more sense to have a domain based model. I may set up a domain based network at home for my next class, which is 70-290 Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment. At home I am not gonna have a quad core Cpu, or TBs or hard drive space. I will just need to follow the recommended system requirements for the NOS. It all depends on what the server is used for. There is no need to spend extra money for hardware that you don't need expecially in a business enviornment. The server at my training facility is less powerfull than my home pc and it is several years old, yet it still does its job well.


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 Post Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:55 am 
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Hi Scott,

Am confused! Could you help us and clarify on this issue?

Kit.


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 Post Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 11:17 am 
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You guys are doing fine, I have nothing to add. <g> Scott.


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 Post Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 12:07 pm 
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Thanks Scott!

Kit


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 Post Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 1:46 pm 
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Hi FatGuy,

The Servers I'm writing about are *Dedicated Servers*! That simply means they're devoted ; committed; consecrated; surrendered to serve/share resources. Sometimes even Network Administrators remove things like monitors, keyboards from these Dedicated Servers to keep people away from them, because their work is dedicated to service. You may ask -- why doesn't Microsoft go ahead and recommend Network Administration to install Xp, Vista Home premium… on these Dedicated Servers? Why does Microsoft decides to design a sophisticated OS for these Dedicated Servers? Besides, why should Microsoft make hardware recommendations for these servers? If it was not for hardware compatibility issues! The answer is simple, because Microsoft knows that when it writes Server NOS, like Microsoft Windows Server 2003 R2 Enterprise and Enterprise x64 Edition, it has written it for a special purpose and for specialized hardware like Intel Xeon processors. For microsoft based Server OS:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/bb736012.aspx

Microsoft knew very well that Home Ender users will need to share resources, IM, email, fax…And said OK, lets incorporate server/networking features in Windows. And I believe this began with Window 95A, 98, 98SE, ME, NT, 2000, 2000 pro, XP HE, XP Pro sp1, sp2,sp3, Crystal and now Vista Home Premium! I really understand thoroughly well that if you have these OS, each PC can be a Server especially on a Peer-to-Peer Network model both domains and Workgroups. Resumes are created basically using word processors not OS. Even a 1994 Ericsson MC218 PDA can create a very neat resume with its notepad! So what I need is to get may be Xp, install office 2007, then use office word 2007 templates for resumes!

On the other hand, the real Dedicated Servers I mean, are the ones that run Server based OS, not PC based OS. Microsoft couldn't spend sleepless night writing things like:

Windows Compute Cluster Server 2003
Windows Server 2003 R2
Windows Small Business Server 2003 R2

Now, the object is that such Server OS, need Server based Hardware! What I want is not creating a Network with my wife and kids PCs or writing a resume. That is common place with Win 9x, XP and Vista HP! Rather, I want to centralize software, hardware, information for over 1000 people in a company- where people can work on big projects in a digital workstyle! Should I purchase an Intel 2GHz Pentium 4 , with 512 DDR-SDRAM, 40 GB hard drive, Xp...? It's ostensible, that I will need a powerful platform, software & hardware. That’s why Co-founder Gordon Moore's Law comes into play -- ‘Processor Power will double every after 18 months'. Memory is doubling now within less than a year. So when the Processor power doubles, that will affect the Ram, the chipset, basically the whole motherboard! So Microsoft has always worked hand-in-hand with Intel to come-up with “Wintel”. So that creates a platform (both software and hardware), whether in Server OS or PC OS.

Therefore a “Dedicated Server” OS will require a specialized Processor, and the specialized Processor will affect the chipset, the Ram, Intrinsically the whole motherboard!

So A “Dedicate Server” is a type of computer, It is NOT a NOS! (Ok, How will it serve other machines without hardware? So you can see what I mean!) – it inputs, stores, outputs, processes information and communicates with other machines(these are basic operations all computers perform through hardware, driven by software) – its both specialized software and specialized hardware – it's both Server OS and Server based Processor – its Wintel (Windows and Intel).

Micheal Meyers A+ Certification Exam Guide Fifth Edition - Chapter 23: Networking, page 994, under Client/Server, he says:

" The client/server system dedicates one machine to act as a "server." Its only function is to serve up resources to the other machines on the network. These servers DO NOT run Windows 9x or Windows XP. They use highly sophisticated and expensive NOSs that are optimized for the sharing and administration of networking resources..."

In the same Chapter 23: Mike Meyers, again says on Page 975

" To make successful network, you need the sending and receiving PCs to use the same hardware protocol. A hardware protocol defines many aspects of a network, from the packet type to the cabling and connectors used. A hardware protocol defines everything necessary to get data from one computer to another..." How many times does the word "defines" appear?

The equation is very simple:

Dedicated Server = Server OS + Server Hardware

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PS: Minus Server Hardware there is NO "Service" whatsoever provided!

Thanks.

Kit


Last edited by Kit Emma on Fri Jun 19, 2009 11:40 pm, edited 8 times in total.

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 Post Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 1:23 am 
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Thanks


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 Post Posted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 11:29 pm 
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Hi Scott,

I always seen this tag <g> at the end of your posts! What does it mean?

Thanks,

Kit


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 Post Posted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 4:44 am 
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The <g> means "grin", as in grinning or smiling. <g> Scott.


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 Post Posted: Sun Nov 25, 2007 2:21 am 
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Hi Scott

Thanks! I'll <g> too!

-- Kit


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 Post Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2007 8:29 pm 
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Hello. My username is JCsmitty2. I'm new to this site and posting. Just recently purchased Scotts 18th edition of Upgrading and Repairing PC's. I am in the process of preparing (studying, etc) for the A+ exam for starters.

Two things: I noticed that the user FatGuy posted as a reply to server certifications "There is no real "specialization" in servers and no specific "server" certification." Again, I am a newbee at all of this--still reading, researching, etc., however, I know that COMPTIA has a Server+ vendor nuetral certification.

Also, Kit Emma mentioned that all of the certs can be expensive--which is true. In 2001 and 2002, due to becoming unemployed, I received free (to me) A+ training --one at a community college, the other at a tech school.

These were seperate situations --the first training even threw in COMTIA' INET+ (which expires 12/31). I had free vouchers, everything. Had I paid for these trainings myself, they would have been between 1,200 to nearly 2,000 (I saw the paperwork). Unforunately, I did not follow through with testing and the A+ has since been revised.

With that said, I recently started doing my own research because I noticed that the schools are very expensive and (to me), didn't provide enough lab work (I was coming in before class, on Saturdays, etc to try to do my own lab work).

There are several websites (which I can post privately) that have 'bundles' where you can get 4 COMPTIA certs for under a grand. They have labs, sample test questions, etc.

This is the way (in addition to using Scott's book) that I am opting to study. With the simulated labs, Ican go at my own pace, plus the companies I found provide one-on-one support if you have any questions.

Again, maybe I am wrong, but Comptia does have on their site a Server+ cert because I have the study materials for it. However, I will be doing the A+ first, then NET+ second. Thanks for the postings.


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 Post subject: Re: Server Certifications
 Post Posted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 11:33 pm 
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The title of this particular forum: Server Hardware.

-- Kit


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 Post Posted: Sat Jun 20, 2009 6:50 am 
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jcsmitty2 wrote:
...Comptia does have on their site a Server+ cert because I have the study materials for it. However, I will be doing the A+ first, then NET+ second.

I agree with your plan of progression, and thanks for using my books in the process. I'd be interested to hear back on how the certifications go as you complete them. If you ever do take the Server+ cert., I'd be interested to hear what you thought of that as well. Scott.


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 Post subject: Re: Server Certifications
 Post Posted: Fri May 14, 2010 5:56 am 
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reading this is there a way to home school your self and take the test. Useing Differnt books.

Yes I understand it not the best way to get your certs but Distance is a factor 100 Miles a day and Money.


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 Post subject: Re: Server Certifications
 Post Posted: Fri May 14, 2010 7:17 am 
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Atol wrote:
...is there a way to home school your self and take the test.

Yes. I'd recommend those produced by my publisher. Scott.


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 Post subject: Re: Server Certifications
 Post Posted: Fri May 14, 2010 3:59 pm 
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I think it is temporarily out of stock at the publisher, but there are still plenty available, both new and used. Scott.


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 Post subject: Re: Server Certifications
 Post Posted: Fri May 14, 2010 5:13 pm 
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ok i'll check back with the book store in a few days again. Are you going to be working on a new edition.


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 Post subject: Re: Server Certifications
 Post Posted: Fri May 14, 2010 5:27 pm 
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There is currently no update scheduled, but that could change in the future. Scott.


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